Between Berlin and Rozdil

I traveled in Ukraine in December, visited Berlin’s Weißensee Jewish cemetery in January, have been to Warsaw and its neighbouring towns of Karczew and Otwock in February. Finally, I had time to edit some of the analogue black and whites from these trips. Here they are…

Continue reading

Advertisements

Sinking in the Sand

In the towns south of Warsaw some traces of the former Jewish presence are still visible. In Falenica is a former synagogue. In Otwock, Karczew and Radość Jewish cemeteries are preserved. But the future of these monuments is uncertain.

Continue reading

What is left of the Jewish Heritage in Góra Kalwaria?

South of Warsaw, Góra Kalwaria was once an important Hasidic court. Thanks to a friend, I was able to find what is left and preserved until the present day. There are the remains of a synagogue – waiting for renovation – and a destroyed but well maintained cemetery. And there is a strange local habit…

Continue reading

A Remnant Rescued from the Flames

Nożyk Synagogue is Warsaw’s last synagogue situated on the left bank of Vistula river that survived World War II. It is one out of two functioning synagogues in the city. Before the war, 400 synagogues and prayer houses were at disposal of the world’s largest Jewish community. Today, Nożyk Synagogue is part of a Jewish community center.

Continue reading

Bródno Jewish Cemetery Revisited

Bródno Jewish cemetery in Warsaw is an extraordinary place. There are intact cemeteries or there are destroyed cemeteries, where no or only a few remains of the former purpose are still visible. Bródno Jewish cemetery is the visibility of destruction.

Continue reading

Brodno Cemetery in Black and White

To visit the Jewish cemetery in the district of Brodno was one of the most impressive experiences during my trip to Warsaw in December. Some days ago I received the scans of the film negatives. Here is a first selection of the black and white photos.

Continue reading

Warsaw

The photo exhibition by Wojciech Wilczyk gave me a good pretext to visit Warsaw. Warsaw, the city that was completely destroyed. Warsaw, the city that resurrected. What gives people the strenght to build a new city upon ruins? My father was in Warsaw when the city went up in flames and was blown up block by block. He was a soldier of the German Wehrmacht, and his unit was in the city during the Warsaw Uprising. He never talked about the war, and I’ll never know what he did. How could he live with the destruction of Warsaw? And how can I?

Continue reading